Orwell Award Announcement SusanOhanian.Org Home


[Susan notes: "Arbitrary" and "destructive" are good terms for describing Achieve. They represent the corporate takeover of the schools.]

Submitted to Boston Herald but not published
06/15/2004

To the editor





Raising the bar for students trying to pass the MCAS and move on with their lives will give us the worst of all possible worlds ("Raise

MCAS Bar Now," June 14). On the one hand, it will likely increase the numbers of students leaving school before graduation, now a whopping 23 percent statewide. Many who leave have likely the MCAS or are bored to tears by all the test preparation. On the other hand, educational quality will decline as pressure increases to

narrow the curriculum even further to just what's on the test.



The truth is we're already asking high school students to pass tests that many competent adults couldn't pass. This likely goes for the

self-appointed testing tsars at Achieve, who had been telling us what a model test the MCAS was and suddenly would like to convince us that

the test is too easy. Time to call our legislators to make sure they have a healthy skepticism about arbitrary and destructive directives from Achieve.

Lisa Guisbond


FAIR USE NOTICE
This site contains copyrighted material the use of which has not always been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. We are making such material available in our efforts to advance understanding of education issues vital to a democracy. We believe this constitutes a 'fair use' of any such copyrighted material as provided for in section 107 of the US Copyright Law. In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107, the material on this site is distributed without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included information for research and educational purposes. For more information click here. If you wish to use copyrighted material from this site for purposes of your own that go beyond 'fair use', you must obtain permission from the copyright owner.