Orwell Award Announcement SusanOhanian.Org Home


NCLB Outrages

Close-Up: No Child Left Behind—Improving Literacy Through School Libraries

Ohanian Comment: Read through this crap and you will get to the assertion that school library media centers
can contribute to improved student achievement by providing instructional materials aligned to the curriculum. . . .


What a stunted view of libraries: instructional materials aligned to the curriculum.

As anyone who has ever browsed in the stacks knows, it's what you come upon that you weren't looking for that proves to be so significant.

Has reading for joy or reading to pique one's interest never occurred to these bozos? Of course not.

Just realize: such pontifications about alignment come from people who are themselves professional aligners, decidedly not readers.



Close-Up: No Child Left Behind—Improving Literacy Through School Libraries


"What happens when we fail to read? Well, we know the answer: the mind remains enslaved to ignorance. The great thoughts of the past are undiscovered. Our horizons remain fixed, limited, surrounded by unknown territory. Our imagination is unengaged. Life itself remains narrow and possibilities remain diminished. And we don't have as much fun, because reading is so pleasurable."

U.S. Secretary of Education Rod Paige, in his remarks announcing an Improving Literacy Through School Libraries grant from the Education Department to Detroit Public Schools, Aug. 11, 2004.

School libraries are critical to meeting schools' instructional goals: they promote literacy by encouraging reading. However, based on the most recent findings in The Status of Public and Private School Library Media Centers in the United States: 1999-2000, a report from the National Center for Education Statistics, about 40 percent of public schools with library media centers did not have a full-time state-certified library media specialist. Only 32 percent of public schools with library media centers maintained a flexible schedule for class visits to the library, while just 50 percent of public school library media centers scheduled times before or after school when students could use the library independently.

Under the No Child Left Behind Act, the Improving Literacy Through School Libraries program is designed to improve the literacy skills of students by providing them with access to up-to-date school library materials; technologically advanced school library media centers; and well trained, professionally certified school library media specialists. This new program is one component of the U.S. Department of Education's commitment to dramatically improve student achievement by focusing available resources, including those of school library media centers, on reading achievement.

School library media centers can contribute to improved student achievement by providing instructional materials aligned to the curriculum; by collaborating with teachers, administrators and parents; and by extending their hours of operation beyond the school day.

The Improving Literacy Through School Libraries program is a competitive one-year grant for school districts in which at least 20 percent of the students are from families with incomes below the poverty line.

Last month, the Department awarded districts across the country 92 of these grants averaging $200,000, nearly double the average amount of grants ($130,000) awarded in 2002, the year of the program's start.

For more information, visit www.ed.gov/programs/lsl.

— The Achiever
U. S. Government, NCLB website
2004-09-15
http://www.ed.gov/news/newsletters/achiever/2004/091504.html#3


INDEX OF NCLB OUTRAGES


FAIR USE NOTICE
This site contains copyrighted material the use of which has not always been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. We are making such material available in our efforts to advance understanding of education issues vital to a democracy. We believe this constitutes a 'fair use' of any such copyrighted material as provided for in section 107 of the US Copyright Law. In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107, the material on this site is distributed without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included information for research and educational purposes. For more information click here. If you wish to use copyrighted material from this site for purposes of your own that go beyond 'fair use', you must obtain permission from the copyright owner.