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The Science of Success

Susan Notes:

We need researchers to carry vido cameras into classrooms, showing how students termed "difficult" and teachers react to read aloud time. . . and documenting the behavioral and cognitive effects of such activity.

I am sure researchers would discover that read alouds have positive effects on teachers as well as students.


By David Dobbs

In 2004, Marian Bakermans-Kranenburg, a professor of child and family studies at Leiden University, started carrying a video camera into homes of families whose 1-to-3-year-olds indulged heavily in the oppositional, aggressive, uncooperative, and aggravating behavior that psychologists call “externalizing”: whining, screaming, whacking, throwing tantrums and objects, and willfully refusing reasonable requests. . . .

Quite a few mothers, for instance, had agreed only reluctantly to read picture books to their fidgety, difficult kids, saying they wouldn’t sit still for it. But according to Bakermans-Kranenburg, when these mothers viewed the playback they were "surprised to see how much pleasure it was for the childâ€"and for them." Most mothers began reading to their children regularly, producing what Bakermans-Kranenburg describes as "a peaceful time that they had dismissed as impossible."

And the bad behaviors dropped. A year after the intervention ended, the toddlers who'd received it had reduced their externalizing scores by more than 16 percent, while a nonintervention control group improved only about 10 percent (as expected, due to modest gains in self-control with age). And the mothers' responses to their children became more positive and constructive. . . .

The Atlantic does not permit reposing of entire articles. And there's much more to this one than the small snippet I have posted. Find the rest at the hot link below.

— David Dobbs
Atlantic online
2009-12-14
http://www.theatlantic.com/doc/print/200912/dobbs-orchid-gene


INDEX OF RESEARCH THAT COUNTS


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