Orwell Award Announcement SusanOhanian.Org Home


Prison vs. Harvard in an Unlikely Debate

Susan Notes:

The inmate debate team is part of a longtime Bard College program helping give prisoners a chance to make a better life. There's something telling about the fact that Harvard didn't know how to respond to the prisoners' bogus argument about charter schools picking up undocumented students. But I applaud the Bard program--and the inmates.

This article provoked 150 online comments. Most were ugly. Many blamed public school teachers for not educating these prisoners right in the first place. But here's one positive comment:

Reader Comment: A big "attaboy" to the Bard and their initiative! The US has 5% of the world's population and 25% of the prisoners. It costs 28-32,000 dollars a year to house a federal prisoner. Prisoners do NOT pay taxes, nor produce any goods. For all you tax paying voters out there, think about it...

by Leslie Brody

NAPANOCH, N.Y.--On one side of the stage at a maximum-security prison here sat three men incarcerated for violent crimes.

On the other were three undergraduates from Harvard College.

After an hour of fast-moving debate on Friday, the judges rendered their verdict.

The inmates won.

The audience burst into applause. That included about 75 of the prisoners' fellow students at the Bard Prison Initiative, which offers a rigorous college experience to men at Eastern New York Correctional Facility, in the Catskills.

The debaters on both sides aimed to highlight the academic power of a program, part of Bard College in Annandale-on-Hudson, N.Y., that seeks to give a second chance to inmates hoping to build a better life.

Ironically, the inmates had to promote an argument with which they fiercely disagreed. Resolved: "Public schools in the United States should have the ability to deny enrollment to undocumented students."

Carlos Polanco, a 31-year-old from Queens in prison for manslaughter, said after the debate that he would never want to bar a child from school and he felt forever grateful he could pursue a Bard diploma. "We have been graced with opportunity," he said. "They make us believe in ourselves."

Judge Mary Nugent, leading a veteran panel, said the Bard team made a strong case that the schools attended by many undocumented children were failing so badly that students were simply being warehoused. The team proposed that if "dropout factories" with overcrowded classrooms and insufficient funding could deny these children admission, then nonprofits and wealthier schools would step in and teach them better.

Ms. Nugent said the Harvard College Debating Union didn't respond to parts of that argument, though both sides did an excellent job.

The Harvard team members said they were impressed by the prisoners' preparation and unexpected line of argument. "They caught us off guard," said Anais Carell, a 20-year-old junior from Chicago.

The prison team had its first debate in spring 2014, beating the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, N.Y. Then, it won against a nationally ranked team from the University of Vermont, and in April lost a rematch against West Point.

Preparing has its challenges. Inmates can't use the Internet for research. The prison administration must approve requests for books and articles, which can take weeks.

In the morning before the debate, team members talked of nerves and their hope that competing against Harvard--even if they lost--would inspire other inmates to pursue educations.

"If we win, it's going to make a lot of people question what goes on in here," said Alex Hall, a 31-year-old from Manhattan convicted of manslaughter. "We might not be as naturally rhetorically gifted, but we work really hard."

Ms. Nugent said it might seem tempting to favor the prisoners' team, but the three judges have to justify their votes to each other based on specific rules and standards.

"We're all human," she said. "I don't think we can ever judge devoid of context or where we are, but the idea they would win out of sympathy is playing into pretty misguided ideas about inmates. Their academic ability is impressive."

The Bard Prison Initiative, begun in 2001, aims to give liberal-arts educations to talented, motivated inmates. Program officials say about 10 inmates apply for every spot, through written essays and interviews.

There is no tuition. The initiative's roughly $2.5 million annual budget comes from private donors and includes money it spends helping other programs follow its model in nine other states.

Last year Gov. Andrew Cuomo, a Democrat, proposed state grants for college classes for inmates, saying that helping them become productive taxpayers would save money long-term. He dropped the plan after attacks from Republican politicians who argued that many law-abiding families struggled to afford college and shouldn't have pay for convicted criminals to get degrees

The Bard program's leaders say that out of more than 300 alumni who earned degrees while in custody, less than 2% returned to prison within three years, the standard time frame for measuring recidivism.

In New York state as a whole, by contrast, about 40% of ex-offenders end up back in prison, mostly because of to parole violations, according to the New York Department of Corrections and Community Supervision.

— Leslie Brody
Wall Street Journal

http://www.wsj.com/articles/an-unlikely-debate-prison-vs-harvard-1442616928


INDEX OF YAHOO, GOOD NEWS!


FAIR USE NOTICE
This site contains copyrighted material the use of which has not always been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. We are making such material available in our efforts to advance understanding of education issues vital to a democracy. We believe this constitutes a 'fair use' of any such copyrighted material as provided for in section 107 of the US Copyright Law. In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107, the material on this site is distributed without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included information for research and educational purposes. For more information click here. If you wish to use copyrighted material from this site for purposes of your own that go beyond 'fair use', you must obtain permission from the copyright owner.